Birds-eye view

I asked Lisa for permission on sharing this article and she of course agreed.
She asked that I add this though….

“I am just a link in the chain and there are so many out there doing the exact same thing.”

Here is a link to the original article:

Birds Eye View

Meet the woman who runs a parrot rescue mission out of her Owasso house.

Lisa Moser also houses parakeets, macaws, Amazons, Cockatoos, Cockatiels and love birds.

Lisa Moser also houses parakeets, macaws, Amazons, Cockatoos, Cockatiels and love birds.  Valerie Grant

 

“He’s flirting with you,” Lisa Moser assures me on a recent visit to her home.

The signs were there: the puffed-out chest, the slight cock of the head and the seductive sideways glances. But the gentle nips on my forearm and the constant circling threw me off.

Moser’s house is filled with parrots — everything from African Greys, like my flirtatious friend — to tiny parakeets and imposing macaws.

A cacophony of squawks and a riot of tropical color greet every visitor at Moser’s Owasso home. A true friend to the feathered, Moser and a sympathetic volunteer crew of avian activists have taken in countless parrots in need from across the U.S.

Through her nonprofit, Soft Landings Parrot Rescue Inc., Moser has matched over 30 displaced birds with loving humans, while fostering an additional 60 or so at any given time in her own house. What started out as a single rescue has turned into an all-out family mission, with Moser, her husband and her kids sharing their lives with an ever-expanding flock of flying friends.

“My husband and children are a huge part of this mission, and without their help and support I could not do what I do to the scale that we do it,” Moser says. “We have given up a lot of things to do this, but we have also gained things.”

Valerie GrantValerie Grant

When not working nights as a nurse, Moser spends significant time rescuing parrots, caring for those she has saved and finding new homes for these birds. Her husband, Chad, and their six kids support her mission, whether it requires them to drive cross-country to fetch an abandoned pair of cockatoos, fill water bowls or clean cages.

“This is a complete family endeavor,” Moser laughs over a din of squawks and the flapping of wings.

The birds are messy and extremely intelligent. Some can live 75 years or longer. Moser says many owners don’t understand that when they bring one home. The result is countless abandoned or mistreated animals.

For Moser, the key is education. “Parrots aren’t domesticated,” she says. “We’ve brought the wild into our home. Often what gets labeled as a behavioral issue is a natural behavior.

“We have to understand that they are what they are, and to think out-of-the-box in order to accommodate them so they can have an enriched life.”

For more information, visit softlandingsparrotrescue.org.

 

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